Virtual Gardener

Virtual Gardener Spring 2011: Climate Change and Your Garden

Over the past year, the Virtual Gardener has found that nothing can bring a pleasant dinner conversation with relatives to a halting stop like the utterance of the phrase "climate change."

I will not say another word on the subject but offer these websites for you to explore.

First, to www.pewclimate.org for an excellent glossary.

John Bartram

by Lesley Parness -- lparness@morrisparks.net

This Virtual Gardener entry is about John Bartram. This year's New Year's Party will allow you to meet John Bartram in person, no small feat as he was born in 1699 and died in 1777. Please read the program description for information about this fabulous presentation!

Sallets and the Father of British Gardening

Virtual Gardener - Summer 2010

Let us now praise the sallet (salad.) This menu item, healthy or haute, is ever present on 21 century tables. Not so a mere 400 years ago, when a dish of arugala was fit for a rabbit, not a king. How did sallets gain acceptance in the dining rooms of royales and common men alike? Through the work of John Evelyn (1620-1706) essayist, diarist, lobbyist, and horticulturalist, who praised their virtues.

The Rush of Citrus

It's worth the olfactory desert of January to smell, on a sunny afternoon in February, the rush of citrus. There's a lovely Meyer's Lemon waiting for you at Willowwood's conservatory.

 

For some closer to home, grow your own. For the real deal on growing your own, check out recommendations at www.fourwindsgrowers.com, Use their citrus variety information chart.  Rangpur Lime sounds divine (I dimly hear the clink of ice cubes...)

 

Living Walls

A recent trip to the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation’s new headquarters in Morristown provided the subject for this issue’s column – Living Walls. I was told that the living wall there is the second largest in the US. The sounds of water trickling down the four stories and the smell of plants certainly improve meetings!

 

Summer, 2009 - Focus on Scotland

The Virtual Gardener must confess. The topic of Scotland has so inflamed her passion for gardens that sitting at the computer is insufficient. Scotland has so many superb gardens that a real trip is the only antidote. So, in writing this column I am hoping to similarly inflame your passion for Scotland and see if we can get so much enthusiasm together that a "Friends" trip to Scotland becomes a reality.

Spring 2009 - This Spring Go (Micro) Green

The smallest, quickest to harvest vegetable is also easy to grow and available in a range of colors, shapes and tastes. Micro greens rule! Try growing them this spring.

Winter 2008 - The Winter Sky

We do look up occasionally, we gardeners - up to the leafy green canopy that is. Come winter, what do we see? Now that the trees are bare, the stars seem especially bright. That is in fact true and is a result of winter’s low humidity, which results in greater sky clarity. Follow me if you want to know more.

Summer, 2008 - Focus on Japan

What is the meaning of this parable posed by 16th century tea master Sen-no-Rikyu? Sen-no-Rikyu built a garden enclosed by a tall hedge that blocked the view of the sea. The wealthy merchant for whom the garden was built was unhappy - until he bent to wash his hands in the water basin.

Why? Visit these websites on gardens of Japan and see if you can come up with an answer.

Let's get warmed up at http://phototravels.net/kyoto/zen-gardens-index.html.

Spring 2008 - Arbor Day and The Bottle Tree

Any virtual exploration of Arbor Day must begin at www.arborday.com where you will find lots of information about the importance of trees. Arbor Day’s founder, J. Sterling Morton understood how trees impact all life of Earth. As Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland, he helped to establish the National Forest Reservations. His home, “Arbor Lodge,” is now a state park. See it at http://library.thinkquest.org/J0111463/arborlodge.htm.

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